June 12 Art Minute: Greek, from Athens, “Skyphos (Drinking Cup)”

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Greek, from Athens, attributed to The Kleophon Painter or The Curti Painter, Skyphos (Drinking Cup). Red-figure: wheel thrown, slip-decorated earthenware, 430–420 BCE. 11 13/16 by 18 13/16 inches. Purchased with funds from the Libbey Endowment, Gift of Edward Drummond Libbey, 1982.88. Classic Court (Gallery 2)

Greek, from Athens, attributed to The Kleophon Painter or The Curti Painter, Skyphos (Drinking Cup). Red-figure: wheel thrown, slip-decorated earthenware, 430–420 BCE. 11 13/16 by 18 13/16 inches. Purchased with funds from the Libbey Endowment, Gift of Edward Drummond Libbey, 1982.88. Classic Court (Gallery 2)

Abhorred by his deformed foot, the goddess Hera, wife of Zeus, threw her son Hephaistos out of Olympus, home of the gods. Hephaistos, the metal-smith for the gods, sought revenge by making a trap for Hera in the form of a magnificent throne. When she sat in it, she was stuck and none of the gods could free her. Dionysos, god of wine and theater, got Hephaistos drunk and led him back in a procession, riding a mule. Hephaistos freed Hera and was reconciled with his divine family. This vessel was used at men’s drinking parties and is one of the largest cups known—it would have been almost impossible to drink from and may have been used instead as a mixing bowl (krater).


Related News: Toledo Museum of Art presents The Berlin Painter and His World: Athenian Vase-Painting in the Early Fifth Century B.C. July 8-Oct. 1, 2017


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