Sept. 30 Art Minute: Paul Manship, ‘Dancer and Gazelles’

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Paul Manship (American, 1885–1966), Dancer and Gazelles. Bronze, modeled 1916, cast 1922. 72 by 73 ½ inches. Frederick B. and Kate L. Shoemaker Fund, 1923.24. Libbey Court

Paul Manship (American, 1885–1966), Dancer and Gazelles. Bronze, modeled 1916, cast 1922. 72 by 73 ½ inches. Frederick B. and Kate L. Shoemaker Fund, 1923.24. Libbey Court

Fluid, graceful motion defines Paul Manship’s Dancer and Gazelles, its sinuous contours and abstract elegance reflecting Manship’s free interpretation of artistic sources. With its streamlined forms and its references to classical subjects, Manship’s sculpture was an important precursor to the Art Deco style. He deftly straddled the traditional taste for decorative beauty and the modernist appreciation of simplified, abstracted form, bringing fame and honor to himself as an artist of great talent and unique vision. His popularity was due in part to his ability to fuse elements from a wide range of cultures and eras. The result was a body of work of great charm that seemed to introduce a revitalizing freshness to American sculpture. This talent is displayed superbly in Dancers with Gazelles, one of his most famous compositions.


2 Responses to “Sept. 30 Art Minute: Paul Manship, ‘Dancer and Gazelles’”

  1. Rose says:

    Nicely written text on one of my favorite TMA sculptures.

  2. Vicki says:

    I’m out of league here. Too much brain power on dipasly!


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