Artwork of the Week

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Artwork of the Week: January 23

Posted on Friday, January 23rd, 2015

Painter Josepha Gasch-Muche believes that every material, regardless of whether it is naturally or industrially produced, has its own inherent structure and texture waiting to be given form. She was attracted to broken LCD (liquid crystal display) glass because it is thin, strong, and can be arranged in different ways to reflect and scatter light. […]

Artwork of the Week: January 16

Posted on Friday, January 16th, 2015

The city of Tanagra gave its name to a type of charming fired clay statuette when thousands were excavated from its cemeteries during the 1870s. The heads, arms, and bodies were formed in molds and assembled, then hand-finished to make each figurine unique with details like earrings, curls of hair, hats, and fans. The surface […]

Artwork of the Week: January 9

Posted on Friday, January 9th, 2015

Georges Braque collaborated closely with Pablo Picasso in working out the approach to painting that would result in Cubism. Whereas Picasso would go on to develop a spectacular series of personal styles, Braque continued to increase his mastery and free use of Cubism’s vocabulary of form, superimposing and combining different views of the same object. […]

Artwork of the Week: January 2

Posted on Friday, January 2nd, 2015

Camille Pissarro was suffering from a chronic eye infection that kept him indoors when he painted this view of the northern French city of Rouen through a window of his hotel (he died blind). As he wrote to his son Lucien, also an artist, in February of 1896, “Just imagine: the whole of old Rouen […]

Artwork of the Week: December 26

Posted on Friday, December 26th, 2014

Aminah Robinson’s series of 10 unique, handmade books, The Ragmud Collection of Folkquilt Stories, is a labor of love created over a two-decade period and showcasing a tremendous range of techniques: from woodcuts to watercolor and acrylic paintings to fabric collage to sculptural constructions made from “hogmawg” (a homemade concoction of mud, pig grease, dye, […]

Artwork of the Week: December 19

Posted on Friday, December 19th, 2014

Recognized as one of this country’s most distinguished artists, Romare Bearden combined in his highly original works of art his academic training as a mathematician, his knowledge of music, his studies of 20th-century art, and his personal experiences of life as an African American man. He was visually inspired by Cubism and the brilliant colors […]

Artwork of the Week: December 12

Posted on Friday, December 12th, 2014

Until its recent appearance in London, this necklace was only known from a circa 1904 drawing by English Arts and Crafts designer Edward Spencer. The necklace not only displays the exquisite craftsmanship typical of the Arts and Crafts style, but also a design rich in complex symbolism. The circle formed by the chain symbolizes order […]

Artwork of the Week: December 5

Posted on Friday, December 5th, 2014

Named for the conical roof of the artist’s studio, Conoid Bench retains the original form of its component boards. A native of the Pacific Northwest, Nakashima carried a deep childhood appreciation for nature into his adult career. This bench is designed according to the individual attributes of the wood planks selected for the bench. Fashioned […]

Artwork of the Week: November 28

Posted on Friday, November 28th, 2014

Palm Trees, Bahamas was painted in the winter months of 1898–99, probably in Nassau, where American master of the watercolor Winslow Homer spent many of his winters beginning around this time. “I think the Bahamas the best place I have ever found,” he wrote. Conceived from a low vantage point, the curving and straight trunks […]

Artwork of the Week: November 21

Posted on Friday, November 21st, 2014

Mina’i pottery, which adapts Chinese techniques, shapes, and imagery, has been identified with Kashan, a city about 125 miles south of modern Tehran, Iran. Kashan remained an important ceramic center through the 17th century. Bowls from Kashan typically depict limited subject matter, such as hunters, musicians, and princes with attendants and animals in gardens—images of […]