Artwork of the Week

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April 15 Art Minute: Toots Zynsky, “Untitled,” from the “Tierra del Fuego Series”

Posted on Friday, April 15th, 2016

Mary Ann (“Toots”) Zynsky explores the fragility of glass as she fashions works of daring color and intense power. Her works suggest both sculptural object and functional vessel, an ambiguity that beguiles with color and reassures with familiar form. […] Zynsky adopted a technique that she jokingly calls “filet de verre” (a play on the […]

April 8 Art Minute: Dale Chihuly, “Campiello del Remer #2”

Posted on Friday, April 8th, 2016

The opening of the new Glass Pavilion in 2006 also introduced a monumental new acquisition by Seattle artist Dale Chihuly to the Museum’s visitors. The glass elements of the sculpture were fabricated at Chihuly’s studio, then cut and engraved at the Waterford® Crystal factory in Ireland in 1995. First configured as a large standing “chandelier,” […]

April 1 Art Minute: Silvia Levenson, “Strange Little Girl #7”

Posted on Thursday, March 31st, 2016

Born in Argentina, Silvia Levenson is of Russian–Jewish descent. Politically active already as a teenager, Levenson immigrated to Italy in 1981 with her husband and young children to escape the oppresive regime of military dictator Jorge Rafaél Videla (ruled 1976–1981), during which members of her family were “disappeared.”Her experiences during this intense and frightening time […]

Mar. 25 Art Minute: Alison Elizabeth Taylor, “Kitchen”

Posted on Friday, March 25th, 2016

At first glance you may assume this work is paint on canvas or board. But look carefully—most of the image is composed of inlayed wood. Alison Taylor has become well-known for reinvigorating the Renaissance craft of marquetry or intarsia wood inlay, which she combines with painting. Describing this synthesis, Taylor explains, “What interests me is […]

Mar. 18 Art Minute: Petah Coyne, “Untitled #1176 (Elisabeth–Elizabeth)”

Posted on Friday, March 18th, 2016

Petah Coyne’s work is often called baroque in its sensibility, but it is equally Victorian—both ornate and somber. In many cases, including this sculpture, her works evoke the colors and imagery of mourning regalia. The violet silk flowers dipped in black wax are studded with brightly hued taxidermy Golden and Lady Amherst pheasants. Dusky candles […]

Mar. 11 Art Minute: Louise Bourgeois, “Shackle Necklace”

Posted on Friday, March 11th, 2016

Louise Bourgeois designed this necklace in the 1940s as a personal statement against the violence she had witnessed against prisoners during the Spanish Civil War (1936–39), who were asphyxiated by shackles of this shape. It was also designed as a comment about the female state, a metaphor for the social, political, and legal constraints of […]

Mar. 4 Art Minute: Rachel Ruysch, “Flower Still Life”

Posted on Friday, March 4th, 2016

From the caterpillar crawling along the stem of a flower, to the browning leaves riddled with holes by hungry insects, Rachel Ruysch has captured every detail of a wild profusion of cut flowers. Such a painting could be appreciated on two levels. A viewer might simply enjoy the skill of the artist and the luscious […]

Feb. 24 Art Minute: Aminah Robinson, “Dad’s Journey,” from “The Ragmund Series: Volume 8, Slave Epics”

Posted on Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

Columbus, Ohio-based artist Aminah Robinson devoted her career to telling and passing on the untold stories of her family, the black community where she grew up, and the often unsung contributions to American history by African Americans. As part of her 10 unique, handmade volumes of The Ragmund Series of books (acquired by the Toledo […]

Feb. 19 Art Minute: Fred Wilson, “Iago’s Mirror”

Posted on Friday, February 19th, 2016

In Shakespeare’s Othello, Iago attempts to destroy the lives and reputations of all who surround him, particularly the black Venetian officer Othello. It is deliberately unclear what Iago’s motivations are for his murderous vendettas—revenge, bigotry, jealousy, a love of deception? Iago’s Mirror was made in traditional 18th-century Rococo style by Murano glassworkers in Venice, according to artist […]

Feb. 12 Art Minute: Alvin Loving, “Dan”

Posted on Friday, February 12th, 2016

When he rose to prominence in the 1960s, Detroit-born African American abstract artist Al Loving’s work was characterized by careful and calculated studies of pure geometric forms. Dan was created at a pivotal turning point in his career—when Loving began to abandon his signature aesthetic in favor of more fluid, large-scale works, often composed through […]